The Bachelor of Arts in mathematics program prepares students to work in industry, government, business or education, as well as for graduate study in mathematics, education, business and other closely related STEM fields, particularly in the interdisciplinary areas of artificial intelligence, computer science, cybersecurity, data science and machine learning. Students may choose elective courses in mathematics and related subjects that focus on methods used to solve problems in quantitative fields of study, more theoretical elective courses that focus on strengthening their knowledge of mathematical fundamentals, or some combination of such electives. They are encouraged to complete a minor in computer science, which they can easily accomplish through the electives.  In all cases, students are exposed via a highly flexible curriculum to the kind of rigorous analysis, logic, and critical thinking that will help them to succeed in their chosen careers and/or advanced studies.  Students meet with a school-based adviser to discuss their course sequence and electives based on their goals and interests. The program is offered by the Lee Gildart and Oswald Haase School of Computer Sciences and Engineering at the Metropolitan Campus, Teaneck, New Jersey.

Students in the B.A. in mathematics program can also pursue one of the three accelerated combined 5-year bachelor’s and master’s degree programs, thereby saving time and money and expanding their career opportunities. The three accelerated programs are as follows:

  • A. in Mathematics/M.A. in Teaching Combined Degree Program (QUEST)
  • A. in Mathematics/M.S. in Computer Science Combined Degree Program
  • A. in Mathematics/M.S. in Cybersecurity and Information Assurance Combined Degree Program

Prerequisites:

  • Elementary and intermediate algebra
  • Plane geometry
  • Trigonometry
  • Two units of science including one unit of physics

GHSCSE also offers a Bachelor of Science in mathematics at the Metropolitan Campus. The educational objectives of the B.A. and B.S. in mathematics programs are fundamentally the same except that the B.A. in mathematics program is built on a liberal arts foundation. The non-mathematics requirements for the two programs are different.

The educational objectives of the BA in mathematics program define the skills, knowledge, and attributes that will be needed and achieved by the graduates for a successful career and professional accomplishments three to four years after graduation.

Educational Objectives

The educational objectives of the Bachelor of Arts in mathematics program define the skills, knowledge and attributes that will be needed and achieved by the graduates for a successful career and professional accomplishments three to four years after graduation. The program will produce graduates who:

  1. Have an appropriate combination of theoretical knowledge and practical skills in mathematics to enter into and advance professionally in mathematics and related fields.
  2. Have a well-rounded education that encourages and supports meaningful dialogue with individuals from other disciplines.
  3. Are able to adapt to and succeed in a dynamic global environment.
  4. Can engage effectively in oral, written and graphical communications in both interpersonal and public settings.
  5. Are prepared to participate in life-long learning opportunities.
  6. Are prepared to continue formal education and obtain advanced degrees in mathematics or related fields.

These objectives are consistent with the mission of Fairleigh Dickinson University to educate and prepare students as world citizens through global education. They also fulfill the needs of our constituencies.

Cooperative Education Option

Students in the B.A. in Mathematics program have the option to undertake a cooperative education experience and earn a total of 6 academic credits toward their electives. Note that these credits may not be substituted for any required course work. The co-op experience provides students a real-world grounding, linking theory and practice, academic and work experiences, and college education and lifelong learning. It better prepares students for jobs, gives them a competitive edge in the job market, helps them develop networking skills and professional contacts and allows them to experience career fields before graduation. Employers benefit from better-prepared graduates with real and relevant work experience – saving time and money by reducing the training period for new employees.

Degree Plan

The B.A. in Mathematics program requires the successful completion of 120 credits with a minimum cumulative grade point ratio of 2.00 as described below.

General Education Requirements (55 credits)

College Competencies (26 credits)

  • Written Communication (6 credits)
    • WRIT1002 Composition I: Rhetoric and Inquiry (3 credits)
    • WRIT1003 Composition II: Research and Argument (3 credits)
  • Speech/Professional Communication (3 credits)
    • ENGR2210 Technical Communications (3 credits)
  • Quantitative Analysis (4 credits)
  • Mathematics or Technology or Statistics (4 credits)
  • Ethical and Moral Analysis (3 credits)
    • ENGR3000 Modern Technologies: Principles, Applications and Impacts (3 credits)
  • Scientific Analysis (6 credits)
    • PHYS2203 University Physics I (3 credits)
    • PHYS2204 University Physics II (3 credits)

Liberal Arts Distribution (21 credits)

  • Language (3 credits)

If a student is beginning a new language, Elementary II (1102) is required to fulfill the 3-credit language requirement. If the student is taking a language previously studied, successful completion of Intermediate I (2103) fulfills the requirement. The student taking a previously studied language must take the placement test. If the placement score is above the Intermediate I level, the student is excused from the language requirement and will need to replace those 3 language credits with a free elective. Students planning to do graduate work should take a 3-credit course in French, German or Russian.

  • Social and Behavioral Sciences (6 credits)

Students take ENGR4210 Managerial and Engineering Economic Analysis to fulfill the social science requirement. They also take another three credits of coursework in COMM, CRIM, GOVT, PSYC, or SOCI.

  • Arts (6 credits)

Take six credits of coursework in ART, CGD, or CREW.

  • Humanities (6 credits)

Take six credits of coursework in ARTH, CINE, CGDH, DANH, HIST, HUMN, LANG (not foreign language), LITS, MUSIH, PHIL, RELI, or THEAH, one must be at the 2000 level or above.

University Requirements (8 credits)

  • UNIV1001 Transitioning to University Life (1 credit)
  • UNIV1002 Preparing for Professional Life (1 credit)
  • UNIV2001 Cross Cultural Perspectives (3 credits)
  • UNIV2002 Global Issues (3 credits)

Major Requirements (36 credits)

Additional Mathematics Requirements (27 Credits)

  • MATH2203 Calculus III (3 credits)
  • MATH2210 Differential Equations (3 credits)
  • MATH2255 Discrete Structures (3 credits)
  • MATH3220 Linear Algebra (3 credits)
  • MATH3225 Abstract Algebra (3 credits)
  • MATH3230 Analysis (3 credits)
  • MATH3237 Probability and Statistics I (3 credits)
  • MATH3341 Advanced Engineering Mathematics (3 credits)
  • Mathematics Elective (3 credits)
  • 3 credits to be chosen from courses numbered 3000 or higher, with the approval of an adviser.

Computer Science Requirements (9 credits)

  • CSCI1201 Computer Programming I (3 credits)
  • CSCI1202 Computer Programming II (3 credits)
  • CSCI2232 Data Structures (3 credits)

Additional Science Requirements (2 credits)

  • PHYS2201 Physics Laboratory I (1 credit)
  • PHYS2202 Physics Laboratory II (1 credit)

Technical Electives (12 credits)

  • Students must take 12 credits of technical electives, which include courses in computer science, engineering, engineering technology, information technology and/or mathematics at appropriate levels based on their interests. Students must obtain prior approval from the Gildart Haase School of Computer Sciences and Engineering academic adviser for all course selections or substitutions.
    • Mathematics courses must be at the 3000- or higher level.
    • A 3-credit course in a related discipline can be substituted for a 3-credit technical elective.
    • Internship credits and honors courses can be used as technical electives. 

Minor Sequence in an Area Related to Mathematics (15 credits)

  • A minor sequence of 15 credits is required in an area related to mathematics. An adviser will assist students in selecting the proper courses.

B.A. in Mathematics/M.A. in Teaching Combined Degree Program (QUEST) 

GHSCSE offers a five-year program that allows qualified students to attain a Bachelor of Arts degree in mathematics and a Master of Arts in teaching at early childhood, primary or secondary levels with different specializations. The combined 5-year program has a course load that is about 15 credits less than that of the separate degrees. This combined program is offered by GHSCSE in collaboration with Peter Sammartino School of Education through their QUEST programs.

B.A. in Mathematics/M.S. in Computer Science Combined Degree Program

GHSCSE offers a five-year program that allows qualified students to attain a Bachelor of Arts degree in mathematics and a Master of Science degree in computer science with a combined-degree load that is 9 credits less than that of the separate degrees. Students must register for this program by their junior year and must have achieved a cumulative grade point ratio of at least 2.75.

B.A. in Mathematics/M.S. in Cybersecurity and Information Assurance Combined Degree Program

GHSCSE offers a five-year program that allows qualified students to attain a Bachelor of Arts degree in mathematics and a Master of Science degree in cybersecurity and information assurance with a combined-degree load that is 9 credits less than that of the separate degrees. Students must register for this program by their junior year and must have achieved a cumulative grade point ratio of at least 2.75.


Contact Information
Stanley Ryan Huddy, Ph.D., Program Coordinator
srh@fdu.edu

Course Descriptions

  • CSCI1201 Elements of algorithm design and problem solving. Elementary data types and arrays. Static and dynamic type checking. Basic control structures and data flow: sequential, conditional, iterative. Assignment statements. Basic input/output. Elements of methods. Design, coding and implementation of programs in various areas using a language such as Java. (Equivalent to INFO 2101 Computer Programming for Information Technologists I)

  • CSCI1202 Stepwise refinement as a programming tool.Data abstraction and modules. Objects and classes. Inheritance and Polymorphism. Advanced put/output. Elements of debugging and testing. Design,coding and implementation of programs in various areas using a language such as Java. Prerequisite:grade of C or better in either CSCI 1201 Computer Programming I or INFO 2101 Computer Programming for Information Technologists I (Equivalent to INFO 2102 Computer Programming for Information Technologists II)

  • CSCI2232 Implementation of abstract data types used in computer science. Arrays, character strings, stacks, queues, one-way and two-way linked lists, trees, graphs and file structures. Searching, sorting, storage management, structure and selection.

  • ENGR2210 Overview of the writing, editing, research, and design principles of technical and professional communication. Students will learn how to gather, organize, and present information effectively. Course includes business and technical documentation, including on-line tools; oral reports and public speaking; teamwork and participation in group meetings; use of visuals to communicate material; professional, ethical, and social responsibilities; and research techniques using the library and the Internet. Prerequiste: ENWR 1101 - Academic Writing

  • ENGR3000 This course provides a systematic introduction to modern technologies, their history, evolutionary development, principles, and applications. The influences and impacts of technology on the economy, politics, culture, environment, society and the world are investigated. Attention is given to the relationships and connections of technology to other fields. Students learn the basic principles underlying the technologies, how to apply and manage technologies and assess their impacts. Critically thinking and problem solving skills used in research, design, development, invention, and innovation are emphasized. The laboratory experiences help the students develop the experimental research, creative and design skills.

  • ENGR4210 Concepts and techniques to evaluate the worth of technical systems, products and services in relation to their cost. Time value of money, cash flow equivalence, economic decision making alternative courses of action, depreciation and taxes, replace- ment and break-even analysis. Prerequisites: Math 2202 Calculus II or permission of instructor

  • MATH1201 Slope, equations of lines, slope of a curve, rate of change of a function, derivatives of algebraic and transcendental functions, maxima and minima, the Mean Value Theorem, indeterminate forms,the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, basic techniques of integration.

  • MATH2202 Differentiation and integration of transcendental functions, methods of integration, indeterminate forms, infinite series. Taylor series. Conic sections.

  • MATH2203 Lines and planes in 3-space. Vectors, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, line integrals, vector analysis.

  • MATH2210 First order linear differential equations, linear differential equations with constant coefficients, variation of parameters, undetermined coefficients, Laplace transforms, solutions in terms of power series, numerical solutions with predictor- corrector and Runge-Kutta methods.

  • MATH2255 Logic, sets, functions, algorithms. Integers, induction and recursion. Relations, posits, equivalence relations, digraphs and matrix representations. Boolean algebra, applications to logic, Boolean identities, Boolean functions, minimization of circuits. Graphs. Trees.

  • MATH3220 Vector spaces and linear transformations; systems of linear equations, bases, matrix representations of linear transforma- tions, matrix algebra, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, determin- ants, canonical forms, inner product spaces.

  • MATH3225 Groups, cyclic groups, subgroups, product and quotient groups, homomorphisms and isomorphisms. Rings, integral domains and fields.

  • MATH3230 Real number-system, limits, sequences, series, single variable calculus, topology of n-space, continuity and differentiability of mappings.

  • MATH3237 Sample spaces, discrete and continuous random variables. Point and Interval Estimation. Tests of Statistical Hypotheses.

  • MATH3341 Vector algebra, vector calculus, gradient, divergence, curl. Line and surface integrals, Green's theorem, Stokes' theorem, divergence theorem. Vector spaces, dot products, matrices, linear equations, determinants, eigenvalues, diagonalization.

  • PHYS2201 Applications of PHYS2101 General Physics I. Experiments from mechanics, heat, sound and fluids. Measurement and data analysis.

  • PHYS2202 Applications of PHYS2102 General Physics II. Experiments from electricity, magnetism, circuits, waves, optics, light, modern physics. Measurement and data analysis.

  • PHYS2203 The first half of a two-semester calculus based physics course for science and engineering majors. Topics normally covered include: units and dimensions, forces and motion in one and two dimensions, vectors, momentum and center of mass, work, kinetic energy and the work-energy theorem, potential energy and the conservation of energy, rotation and moment of inertia, torque and angular momentum, gravitation, oscillations, elasticity, fluids, heat, kinetic theory of gases, thermodynamics. Co-requisite: Physics Laboratory I and Calculus I. Lecture: 3 credits, 4 hours.

  • PHYS2204 The second half of a two-semester, calculus based physics course. Topics normally covered include: waves and sound, geometrical and physical optics, electrical forces and fields, electric potential, current and resistance, circuits, capacitance, magnetic forces and fields, force on a moving charge, magnetic field of a current, electromagnetic induction, electromagnetic oscillations and waves, alternating currents, special relativity, quantization and modern physics. Prerequisite: University Physics I Corequisite: Physics Laboratory II Recommended: Calculus II. Lecture 3 credits, 4 hours.

  • UNIV1001 The first course in the University Core program provides support for the transition to university life. Students are introduced to the global mission of the University as well as to the competencies of information and technological literacy. Students participate in formal and informal learning experiences that facilitate their personal and academic growth, enabling them to become more thoughtful and engaged citizens of the world. Respect for individual and cultural differences is fostered throughout the course, as is the generation of positive attitudes toward life long learning.

  • UNIV1002 The second course in the University Core program helps promote the transition from classroom learning to experiential learning, as well as the transition from academic life to professional life. Students are introduced to methods of self-awareness and engaged learning, and are encouraged to develop an academic plan, with formal and informal components, that supports their ultimate career goals. Respect for individual and cultural differences is fostered throughout the course, as is the importance of an international perspective for professional success.

  • UNIV2001 In the third course in the University Core program, students learn to describe and analyze cultural phenomena in their own lives, to grapple with cultural differences and to understand cultural conflicts. Through a study of samples across a variety of cultures, students examine the fluidity and multiplicity of cultural identities and borders. Ways in which cultures changes, how cultures shape and are shaped by individuals, how misunderstands and conflicts arise within and between cultures, and how those differences evolve are central to the course. Critical thinking skills are a developed and brought to bear on these topics.

  • UNIV2002 In the fourth course in the University Core program, students develop essential aspects of critical thinking and apply those skills in evaluating international systems, environmental issues, and human rights questions. Not only will this course demonstrate the global dimensions of crucial contemporary issues, it will also develop the relational thinking that students will be expected to exercise in other academic contexts and throughout the rest of their personal and professional lives. In other words, this course is as much about how to study and think about global problems and relationships as it is a course about specific global issues.

  • WRIT1002 This course provides students with intensive study and practice in process-oriented writing, critical reading, and rhetorical inquiry. Students engage expository texts in order to describe and evaluate the choices writers make and then apply that knowledge to their own compositions. Throughout the course, students give and receive feedback, revise their work, and reflect on their growth as writers.

  • WRIT1003 This course focuses on the study and practice of writing as research-based argument. As a means of arriving at the writing from committed stances, students learn to seek out, engage, and interrogate a variety of sources. Students write in academic, professional, and/or public forms, including academic essays and rhetorical analyses. Particular emphasis is placed on information literacy, source integration, and appropriate documentation.