The Physical Therapy Program is a collaborative program between  Fairleigh Dickinson University (FDU) and the Rutgers University-School of Health Professions (Rutgers-SHP). Students will complete the pre-professional courses at FDU for 3 years and the professional Physical Therapy courses at Rutgers University. The program specializes in doctoral-level education for individuals wishing to become physical therapists. Students in the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program receive state-of-the-art education that prepares them to be in the forefront of the physical therapy profession.

Upon completion of the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program students are prepared to enter the physical therapy profession as a clinician of practicing in an autonomous and ethical manner. The graduate will have skills in differential diagnosis as well as in advanced clinical and management practices. They will be able to understand and apply research presented in various formats to clinical decision making and practice and will be expected to lead the profession in the changes needed for effective practice in the 21st century.

  • Employment rate in various healthcare agencies in the tri-state area – 100%
  • Salary range after completion of Doctorate in Physical Therapy degree by the Bureau of Labor Statistics –  $89,000 – $94,000

Admission Requirements

Admission to FDU

  • High School graduation or equivalent diploma (GED)
  • English as a Second Language (ESL) placement test is required and completion of ESL courses, if necessary.
  • Earn a minimum of 550 on TOEFL Exam for applicants with foreign credentials who are transferring into the DPT  program.
  • Completion of any necessary developmental courses as determined by the University’s Basic Skill Test.
  • A minimum GPA of 2.75 is required for all transfer students.

Admission to Rutgers University SHP

All applicants to the FDU/DPT program students must:

  • Complete all General Education & Core Requirements (97 cr.) maintaining an overall GPA of 3.0
  • Maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all required science and math courses.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the physical therapy profession through actual work or volunteer experience
  • Demonstrate evidence of community service
  • Formally apply to the Rutgers-SHP Physical Therapy Program for the professional component of the program; (admission to the program cannot be guaranteed by FDU)
  • Satisfactory score on all three sections (Verbal, Quantitative and Analytical) of the Graduate Record Exam (GRE)
  • Submit three letters of recommendation
  • Have basic computer literacy, including file management, use of word processing and spreadsheet programs, use of email and the internet.

Degree Plan

Joint Degree Program – Doctorate in Physical Therapy

Students in the entry-level component of the Physical Therapy Program spend their first three years at Fairleigh Dickinson University completing 92 credits of required courses (University Requirements: 35 credits and major requirements: 59 credits). Students must formally apply for acceptance to the professional component at the Rutgers-SHP Physical Therapy Program. Students accepted to the program will complete their fourth year at Rutgers-SHP where they take 45 credits. All 45 credits will be transferred back to Fairleigh Dickinson University after which FDU will award a Bachelor of Science degree (B.S. in Biology). Upon successful completion of the remainder of the required coursework of the DPT program, Rutgers-SHP will award a Doctorate in Physical Therapy (DPT) degree.

Physical Therapy Degree Program Joint program with FDU/Rutgers-SHP

1st Semester(16 credits)

2nd Semester(15 credits)

3rd Semester(18 credits)

4th Semester(18 credits)

5th Semester(17 credits)

6th Semester(16 credits)

Doctorate in Physical Therapy

General Education Requirements (53 credits)

College Competencies (24 Credits)

ENWR1101     Academic Writing
ENWR1102     Academic Research & Writing
SPCH1155     Public Speaking
MATH1107     Pre Calculus
MEDT1130     Bioethics
BIOL2203/BIOL1113     Anatomy & Physiology I
BIOL204/BIOL1114     Anatomy & Physiology II

Liberal Arts Electives (16 Credits)

CSCI1105     Computer & Computer Software
MATH1202     Calculus I
PSYC1103     General Psychology
PSYC2201     Statistics

University Requirements (8 Credits)

UNIV1001     Transitioning to University Life
UNIV1002     Preparing for Professional Life
UNIV2001     Cross-cultural Perspectives
UNIV2002     Global Issues

Major Requirements (44 credits)

BIOL1251/BIOL1253     General Biology I
BIOL1252/BIOL1254     General Biology II
BIOL2125/BIOL2126     Microbiology for Health Sciences
CHEM1201     General Chemistry I
CHEM1203     General Chemistry I Lab
CHEM1202     General Chemistry II
CHEM1204     General Chemistry II Lab
CHEM2261     Organic Chemistry I
CHEM2263     Organic Chemistry I Lab
CHEM2262     Organic Chemistry II
CHEM2264     Organic Chemistry II Lab
PHYS2101     General Physics I
PHYS2201     General Physics I Lab
NURS4420     Health Care Management
NURS3280     Health Care Economics

UMDNJ-SHP DPT in Physical Therapy Courses – Year I (4 credits)

Summer Semester (August) (4 credits)

Gross Anatomy

Fall Semester (16 credits)

  • Kinesiology
  • Pathophysiology I
  • Professional Development
  • Examination and Measurement
  • Examination and Intervention
  • Clinical Inquiry I

Spring Semester (18 credits)

  • Neuroscience
  • Pathophysiology II
  • Therapeutic Exercise
  • Physical Agents
  • Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy
  • Clinical Inquiry II

Special Information

In collaboration with Fairleigh Dickinson University and Rutgers University, School of Health Professions (SHP).

Students will complete 3 years of pre-professional courses at FDU. 

Upon completion of the first year physical therapy courses at Rutgers University, the credits will transfer back to Fairleigh Dickinson University and students will be awarded with a Bachelor of Science in Biology degree. The Doctorate in Physical Therapy degree will be awarded by Rutgers upon completion of the Doctorate in Physical Therapy program.

 

Course Descriptions

  • BIOL1113 LAB associated with BIOL 1103 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

  • BIOL1114 LAB - associated with BIOL 1104 - Human Anatomy & Physiology II

  • BIOL1251 Modern biological principles and processes relating organismal diversity, evolution, ecology and behavior.

  • BIOL1252 Modern biological principles and processes relating organismal diversity, evolution, ecology and behavior. Cell structure and function, cell metabolism, genetics biochemistry.

  • BIOL1253 Experiments illustrating the topics discussed in BIOL 1251.

  • BIOL1254 Experiments illustrating the topics discussed in BIOL 1252.

  • BIOL2125 Introduction to microbial world, bacteriology, virology, mycology, parasitology, and immunology. Suitable for students planning a career in health sciences.

  • BIOL2126 Isolation and identification of common pathogenic and nonpathogenic organisms staining, culturing, fermentation reactions and microscopic examinations.

  • BIOL2203 Study of organ systems of the human body. Cells, tissues, integumentary system, skeletal system, articulations,muscular systems, nervous system, special senses. Required of students in the nursing program.

  • BIOL2204 Study of organ systems of the human body. Circulatory system, lymphatic system, urinary system, endocrine system, male and female reproductive systems and embryonic development. Required of students in the nursing program.

  • BIOL2223 LAB Associated with BIOL 2203 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

  • BIOL2224 LAB - associated with BIOL 2204 - Human Anatomy & Physiology II

  • CHEM1201 The fundamental laws, theories and principles of chemistry, with emphasis on atomic structure, chemical bonding, periodic classification of the elements, solutions, equilibrium, reaction kinetics and the theory and practice of the qualitative chemistry of the common ions.

  • CHEM1202 Fundamental principles of chemistry, with emphasis on atomic and molecular structure, physical, chemical and periodic properties, stoichiometry, energetics, kinetics and equilibria of reactions, and descriptive chemistry of elements, including theory of qualitative analysis of common ions.

  • CHEM1203 Practical applications of the fundamental laws, theories and principles of chemistry through problem solving and laboratory experiments.

  • CHEM1204 Laboratory experiments emphasizing representative physical and chemical properties, synthetic and analytical techniques, and including an introduction to the qualitative analysis of the common ions.

  • CHEM2261 Structure and chemical properties of aliphatic and aromatic compounds of carbon, with emphasis on electronic theory, mechanisms of reaction and principles of synthesis.

  • CHEM2262 Structure and chemical properties of aliphatic and aromatic compounds of carbon, with emphasis on electronic theory, mechanisms of reaction and principles of synthesis.

  • CHEM2263 A laboratory course taken concurrently with CHEM 2261- Organic Chemistry I, which illustrates important principles of structure and reactivity, synthesis and analysis and structure determination of organic compounds.

  • CHEM2264 A laboratory course taken simultaneously with CHEM 2262 Organic Chemistry II that illustrates important principles of structure and reactivity, synthesis and analysis and structure determination of organic compounds.

  • CORE1001 The purpose of this course is to stimulate personal reflection by carefully examining situations in which individuals struggle to come to grips with some very important features of self--integrity, purity of heart, the ability to make choices. Individuals seek to find meaning in their consciousness of their own mortality and to forge understandings of themselves through consciousness of their relation to nature. The effects of genetics, internal conflict, the totalitarian state and social prejudice pose challenges to the very survival of the individual self, but the challenges show individuals' courage to grow and to survive. Readings include Plato's Apology and Crito, Gilgamesh, Freud's Civilization and Its Discontents, Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, Wiesel's Night and Haley's The Autobiography of Malcolm X.

  • CORE2002 Citizens of the United States have had, since the country?s beginning, a vision of the future which has in its various meanings come to be called The American Dream. This course explores this idea through four questions. Who is to be included in and who is excluded from the Dream? Can the individual?s pursuit of the Dream be harmonized with the claims of the state? Does American art expose a melancholy tension in the American Dream, a tension between nostalgia for the past and a lust for innovation? Lastly, how do the aspects of the Dream that stress wealth, fame and power affect the polity and image of America in the world? Texts include the U. S. Constitution, Franklin?s Autobiography, selections from de Tocqueville?s Democracy in America, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglas, The Great Gatsby and selections of the artwork from the Whitney Museum of American Art?s collection, The American Effect.?

  • CORE2003 Our practices seem natural to us. Using sources from anthropologists, historians, sociologists, and philosophers, this course seeks to produce an awareness of one's own being as being in-culture(s). The course will teach students to describe and analyze cultural phenomena in their own lives. Through a study of samples from a variety of cultures, students will examine the fluidity and multiplicity of cultural identities and borders. Ways in which cultures change, how cultures shape and are shaped by individuals, how misunderstandings and tensions arise between cultures and how those differences evolve are central to the course. Understanding some of the dynamics of cultural identity and difference is essential for becoming a global citizen.

  • CORE3004 This capstone course of The University Core sequence examines three topics- global economics, the environment, and world governance/ citizenship. Critical thinking skills are brought to bear on values at issue in each of these areas.

  • CSCI1105 History of computers, hardware and software systems, files and data bases, algorithms, personal computers, computer communications and networking, computers and society: applications, issues and responsibilities. (No credit for computer science majors.)

  • ENGL2201 Representative works of world literature focusing on the ancient classics. Fall, Spring

  • ENWR1101 Intensive study and practice in process-oriented college writing based on the critical essay.

  • ENWR1102 Intensive study and practice in college writing, emphasizing documentation and the process of research, including locating, evaluating, analyzing, and integrating sources. Prerequisite: ENWR 1101 Academic Writing

  • FRSH1000 To help successfully make the transition to college life and studies, FDU has developed its Freshman Seminar program. The course provides entering students with a learning experience that helps and supports the transition and adjustment to college and campus life. Students are expected to participate in learning experiences that facilitate their growth and development in both the academic and interpersonal areas. Openness to a multicultural environment and respect for individual differences are fostered throughout the course along with generating positive attitudes toward lifelong learning. During the course of a semester, topics such as academic support, human diversity, wellness, self-defense and health- related issues, including drug and alcohol awareness, are presented and discussed from the perspective of shared concerns of the University family.

  • MATH1107 Algebraic operations, factoring, exponents, radicals; quadratic and higher degree equations; systems of linear equations; functions and their graphs; exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions and their graphs; trigonometric identities; triangle trigonometry.

  • MEDT1130 An interdisciplinary exploration of ethical issues in today's health care practice with particular emphasis on the role of the professional in ethical decision making. Topics include: values clarification of ethical theories and principles, human subjects in research, informed consent, advanced directives, euthanasia, and physician-assisted suicide. Work assignments include case analysis, using ethical decision-making models.

  • MEDT4420 An exploration of the current health care environment with implications for beginning- level managers. Topics to be discussed include managed care, health care delivery models, interdisciplary team building, resource management, case management, performance improvement and conflict resolution.

  • NURS4420 An exploration of the current health care environment with implications for beginning- level managers. Topics to be discussed include managed care, health care delivery models, interdisciplinary team building, resource management, performance improvement and conflict resolution.

  • PHIL1000 Do other people matter? What are the limits of toleration? Can we be citizens of the world? This inquiry-based introduction to the study of philosophy emphasizes the importance of critical thinking, moral reasoning and cross-cultural understanding for citizenship, professional life and scholarship across academic disciplines.

  • PHYS2101 The first semester of a survey of physics: mechanics, heat, sound, optics. A quantitative, noncalculus treatment oriented toward the biological sciences.

  • PHYS2201 Applications of PHYS2101 General Physics I. Experiments from mechanics, heat, sound and fluids. Measurement and data analysis.

  • PHYS2202 Applications of PHYS2102 General Physics II. Experiments from electricity, magnetism, circuits, waves, optics, light, modern physics. Measurement and data analysis.

  • PHYS2203 The first half of a two-semester calculus based physics course for science and engineering majors. Topics normally covered include: units and dimensions, forces and motion in one and two dimensions, vectors, momentum and center of mass, work, kinetic energy and the work-energy theorem, potential energy and the conservation of energy, rotation and moment of inertia, torque and angular momentum, gravitation, oscillations, elasticity, fluids, heat, kinetic theory of gases, thermodynamics. Co-requisite: Physics Laboratory I and Calculus I. Lecture: 3 credits, 4 hours.

  • PHYS2204 The second half of a two-semester, calculus based physics course. Topics normally covered include: waves and sound, geometrical and physical optics, electrical forces and fields, electric potential, current and resistance, circuits, capacitance, magnetic forces and fields, force on a moving charge, magnetic field of a current, electromagnetic induction, electromagnetic oscillations and waves, alternating currents, special relativity, quantization and modern physics. Prerequisite: University Physics I Corequisite: Physics Laboratory II Recommended: Calculus II. Lecture 3 credits, 4 hours.

  • PSYC1101 Basic principles. Topics include methods, cognition, development, interpersonal behavior, personality and psychological disorders.

  • PSYC1103 A survey of topics including, but not limited to research methods, brain and behavior, motivation, consciousness, development, sensation and perception, leaning, memory and cognition, emotions, personality, social psychology and psychological disorders.

  • PSYC2201 Statistical concepts and procedures, with emphasis on descriptive statistics and an introduction to inferential statistics. Relevance to behavioral sciences.

  • SPCH1155 Training in the organization of ideas and effective delivery through practice in speaking before an audience.

  • UNIV1001 The first course in the University Core program provides support for the transition to university life. Students are introduced to the global mission of the University as well as to the competencies of information and technological literacy. Students participate in formal and informal learning experiences that facilitate their personal and academic growth, enabling them to become more thoughtful and engaged citizens of the world. Respect for individual and cultural differences is fostered throughout the course, as is the generation of positive attitudes toward life long learning.

  • UNIV1002 The second course in the University Core program helps promote the transition from classroom learning to experiential learning, as well as the transition from academic life to professional life. Students are introduced to methods of self-awareness and engaged learning, and are encouraged to develop an academic plan, with formal and informal components, that supports their ultimate career goals. Respect for individual and cultural differences is fostered throughout the course, as is the importance of an international perspective for professional success.

  • UNIV2001 In the third course in the University Core program, students learn to describe and analyze cultural phenomena in their own lives, to grapple with cultural differences and to understand cultural conflicts. Through a study of samples across a variety of cultures, students examine the fluidity and multiplicity of cultural identities and borders. Ways in which cultures changes, how cultures shape and are shaped by individuals, how misunderstands and conflicts arise within and between cultures, and how those differences evolve are central to the course. Critical thinking skills are a developed and brought to bear on these topics.

  • UNIV2002 In the fourth course in the University Core program, students develop essential aspects of critical thinking and apply those skills in evaluating international systems, environmental issues, and human rights questions. Not only will this course demonstrate the global dimensions of crucial contemporary issues, it will also develop the relational thinking that students will be expected to exercise in other academic contexts and throughout the rest of their personal and professional lives. In other words, this course is as much about how to study and think about global problems and relationships as it is a course about specific global issues.